Introduction The Chocolate The Village The People Resouces

 


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REMEMBERING BAKER'S EMPLOYEES



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WORKING AT BAKER'S
Seasonal Work
War-Time
Community
Remembering
John Beam
Grace Bolster
Gladys (Delano) George
Watson Kilcup
Joseph Layton
Hugh McCue
George Savage
John Swift
Ariel "Bob" Wills
 
Joseph Layton, ca. 1926
Courtesy of the
Milton Historical Society
Joseph Layton
From The Chocolate Press - June 5, 1926:

“'Hello, man!'

'Hello, Joe, you’ll catch cold crossing the street dressed like that.'

'Oh, no, I never move fast enough to catch anything.'

“Joe Layton, one of the High Hat victims of this week’s issue, is an old timer. Born in Falmouth, Nova Scotia, on July 24, 1854, he was caught by the spirit, which moved so many of his people here, and settled in Dorchester Lower Mills in 1880. He worked for some time as a carpenter for Fred Severance and James Pope, but in 1883 entered the employ of Walter Baker & Co., Ltd. He has been on the payroll ever since and singularly always in the Shaker Room. Forty-three years of patient, willing service, a record of which he is proud.

“During that period Joe has taken but one vacation. It was while he was working on an extractor, something went wrong and Joe, in trying to fix it, lost one of his fingers. Mr. Gallagher, who was then Superintendent, cared for him until the doctor arrived. Six weeks passed before Joe came back to work.

“Of course we all know Joe’s poetical talents, but aside from that he is somewhat of a philosopher. He maintains that 'people are no better than they want to be.’ There is no doubt but that Joe lives according to that philosophy and there isn’t another man in the employ, who by actual performance has served the company’s interests to any better degree.”